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your changing body

Puberty is the time when you physically become an adult. During puberty, your body goes through lots of changes. And your emotions might feel stronger and more intense. People usually start going through puberty between ages 8 and 14. Females often start puberty before males do.

how you can prevent unwanted pregnancy

 find your best birth control method:

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sexually transmitted diseases

STDs are infections that are spread from one person to another, usually during vaginal, anal, and oral sex. They’re really common, and lots of people who have them don’t have any symptoms. Without treatment, STDs can lead to serious health problems. But the good news is that getting tested is no big deal, and most STDs are easy to treat.

STD tests are quick and easy.

Most of the time, STDs have no symptoms. Testing is the only way to know for sure if you have an STD. So if you’ve had any kind of sexual contact that can spread STDs — like vaginal, anal, or oral sex — talk with a doctor or nurse about getting tested.

 

 

Different STDs have different symptoms. Signs of STDs include:

sores or bumps on and around your genitals, thighs, or butt cheeks

weird discharge from your vagina or penis

burning when you pee and/or having to pee a lot

itching, pain, irritation and/or swelling in your penis, vagina, vulva, or anus

flu-like symptoms like fever, body aches, swollen glands, and feeling tired.

Make an appointment at our Women's Clinic to learn more about protecting yourself from curable (chlamydia, gonorrhea, or syphilis) and incurable (HIV and herpes) STDs.

TYPES OF STDS

Chlamydia

A very common STD caused by a bacterial infection. Often doesn’t have symptoms, but easy to treat once it’s diagnosed.

genital warts

Growths on the genital area and around the anus. Caused by certain types of HPV.

gonorrhea

A common STD caused by a bacterial infection. Often doesn’t have symptoms, but easy to treat once it’s diagnosed.

hepatitis b

A virus that can cause liver disease, which is spread through sex or sharing personal hygiene items like razors or toothbrushes.

herpes

A common STD that infects your mouth and/or genitals. Causes blistery sores. There’s no cure, but symptoms are treatable.  

hiv & aids

HIV is an infection that breaks down your immune system and can lead to AIDS. There’s no cure, but treatment can help you stay healthy.

hpv (human papillomavirus)

A super common STD. HPV is usually harmless and goes away by itself, but some types can lead to cancer.

molluscum

contagiousm

An infection that causes small bumps on your skin. It goes away by itself and usually isn’t dangerous.

pubic lice

AKA “crabs.” Small parasites that attach to the skin and hair near your genitals. Easy to get rid of with treatment you can get at the drugstore.

scabies

Scabies are tiny parasites that cause itching. Passed through skin-to-skin contact, usually during sex. Can be cured.

Syphilis

Syphilis is a common bacterial infection. It’s easily cured with medicine, but it can be dangerous if you don’t treat it.

trichomoniasis

“Trich” is a major cause of vaginitis. It’s very common and easily treated.

going to the doctor

Going to the doctor is an important part of making sure you stay healthy. Doctors can also answer any questions you have about puberty, your body, and sex.

 

SEXUAL WELLNESS CHECK-UP:

People who have sex or are thinking about having sex (including vaginal, anal, or oral sex) need regular sexual health check-ups to make sure they stay healthy. It can include things like pelvic exams, STD tests, or problem visits when you’re worried about a lump, bump, pain, discomfort, or when something feels off.

Make an appointment at our Women's Clinic to learn more about protecting yourself from curable (chlamydia, gonorrhea, or syphilis) and incurable (HIV and herpes) STDs.

your privacy

Most doctors and nurses won’t tell anybody — including your parents — what happens during your appointment. Many states have special laws that protect your right to get private sexual health care, even if you’re under 18. But laws are different in every state. And in certain places someone from the doctor’s office might contact your parent or guardian when you’re under 18. If you’re worried about privacy, call the doctor’s office or health center to ask about their privacy policies.

If you use a parent’s health insurance to pay for your doctor’s appointment, they might get a statement in the mail that says what services you got. If you’re using a parent’s or anyone else’s health insurance and don’t want them to know about your doctor’s visit, call the insurance company to find out about their privacy policies (the number is usually on the back of your insurance card). Or talk with your doctor about how to keep your visit private.

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Which birth control is right for me?

Birth control is how you prevent pregnancy. There are lots of different birth control options out there.

We’re here to help you figure it all out.

 
 

Talk to a doctor

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